Water, water everywhere – but is it essential to life?

Water, water everywhere – but is it essential to life? – New research by scientists at the University of Bristol has challenged one of the key beliefs in chemistry: that proteins are dependent on water to survive and function. The team’s findings, published this month in Chemical Science, could eventually lead to the development of new industrial enzymes. Reference: ‘Hyper-thermal stability and unprecedented re-folding of solvent-free liquid myoglobin,’ by A. Brogan et al, Chemical Science DOI: 10.1039/C2SC20143G

Water, water everywhere – but is it essential to life? – New research by scientists at the University of Bristol has challenged one of the key beliefs in chemistry: that proteins are dependent on water to survive and function. The team’s findings, published this month in Chemical Science, could eventually lead to the development of new industrial enzymes. Reference: ‘Hyper-thermal stability and unprecedented re-folding of solvent-free liquid myoglobin,’ by A. Brogan et al, Chemical Science DOI: 10.1039/C2SC20143G

Author: Robert Slinn

Robert Slinn is ChemSpy's guest columnist. You can read his chemical news updates under the banner "Slinn Pickings". Robert is a Chartered Chemist (CChem), Member of the Royal Society of Chemistry (MRSC) and is a Visiting Researcher in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Liverpool. He has extensive experience in R&D: synthesis, analysis and analytical methods development; troubleshooting, consultancy, and teaching/training methods in industry and in academia. Robert is also 'Physical Methods' author for the Specialist Periodical Report series 'Organophosphorus Chemistry', published by Royal Society of Chemistry, Cambridge, UK. Robert has worked alongside David on the Bedside Book of Chemistry and a major Thomson-Reuters report on the state of the pharmaceutical industry for the 2011 International Year of Chemistry