University of Tennessee professors take big step to develop nuclear fusion power

University of Tennessee professors take big step to develop nuclear fusion power – Imagine a world without man-made climate change, energy crunches or reliance on foreign oil. It may sound like a dream world, but University of Tennessee engineers have made a giant step toward making this scenario a reality: http://www.sciencecodex.com/university_of_tennessee_professors_take_big_step_to_develop_nuclear_fusion_power-92968, Source: University of Tennessee at Knoxville

University of Tennessee professors take big step to develop nuclear fusion power – Imagine a world without man-made climate change, energy crunches or reliance on foreign oil. It may sound like a dream world, but University of Tennessee engineers have made a giant step toward making this scenario a reality: http://www.sciencecodex.com/university_of_tennessee_professors_take_big_step_to_develop_nuclear_fusion_power-92968, Source: University of Tennessee at Knoxville

Author: Robert Slinn

Robert Slinn is ChemSpy's guest columnist. You can read his chemical news updates under the banner "Slinn Pickings". Robert is a Chartered Chemist (CChem), Member of the Royal Society of Chemistry (MRSC) and is a Visiting Researcher in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Liverpool. He has extensive experience in R&D: synthesis, analysis and analytical methods development; troubleshooting, consultancy, and teaching/training methods in industry and in academia. Robert is also 'Physical Methods' author for the Specialist Periodical Report series 'Organophosphorus Chemistry', published by Royal Society of Chemistry, Cambridge, UK. Robert has worked alongside David on the Bedside Book of Chemistry and a major Thomson-Reuters report on the state of the pharmaceutical industry for the 2011 International Year of Chemistry

1 thought on “University of Tennessee professors take big step to develop nuclear fusion power”

  1. Yes, we know power stations are just giant kettles that spin a dynamo in the stream of steam. How else do you propose to convert heat into electricity?

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