Theorem unifies superfluids and other weird materials

Theorem unifies superfluids and other weird materials – University of California, Berkeley, physicist Hitoshi Murayama and graduate student Haruki Watanabe have discovered a commonality among these materials that can be used to predict or even design new materials that will exhibit such unusual behavior. The theory applies equally to magnets, crystals, neutron stars, and cosmic strings. Reference: H. Watanabe and H. Murayama, 'Unified Description of Non-Relativistic Nambu-Goldstone bosons,' Physical Review Letters, April 2012 updated.

Theorem unifies superfluids and other weird materials – University of California, Berkeley, physicist Hitoshi Murayama and graduate student Haruki Watanabe have discovered a commonality among these materials that can be used to predict or even design new materials that will exhibit such unusual behavior. The theory applies equally to magnets, crystals, neutron stars, and cosmic strings. Reference: H. Watanabe and H. Murayama, 'Unified Description of Non-Relativistic Nambu-Goldstone bosons,' Physical Review Letters, April 2012 updated.

Author: Robert Slinn

Robert Slinn is ChemSpy's guest columnist. You can read his chemical news updates under the banner "Slinn Pickings". Robert is a Chartered Chemist (CChem), Member of the Royal Society of Chemistry (MRSC) and is a Visiting Researcher in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Liverpool. He has extensive experience in R&D: synthesis, analysis and analytical methods development; troubleshooting, consultancy, and teaching/training methods in industry and in academia. Robert is also 'Physical Methods' author for the Specialist Periodical Report series 'Organophosphorus Chemistry', published by Royal Society of Chemistry, Cambridge, UK. Robert has worked alongside David on the Bedside Book of Chemistry and a major Thomson-Reuters report on the state of the pharmaceutical industry for the 2011 International Year of Chemistry