Aqueous iron interacts as strong as solid iron

Aqueous iron interacts as strong as solid iron – HZB scientists have applied a new method — 'inverse Partial Fluorescence Yield' (iPFY) on micro-jets — which will enable them to probe the electronic structure of liquids free of sample damages. Reference: 'Probing Coster–Kronig Transitions in Aqueous Fe2 Solution Using Inverse Partial and Partial Fluorescence Yield at the L-Edge', The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, 2012; 3 (12): 1619 [cite]10.1021/jz300403n[/cite]