A new glow for electron microscopy

A new glow for electron microscopy – The glowing green molecule known as green fluorescent protein (GFP) has revolutionized molecular biology. When GFP is attached to a particular protein inside a cell, scientists can easily identify and locate it using fluorescence microscopy. However, GFP can't be used with electron microscopy, which offers much higher resolution than fluorescence microscopy. Chemists from MIT have now designed a GFP equivalent for electron microscopy—a tag that allows scientists to label and visualize proteins with unprecedented clarity. http://phys.org/news/2012-10-electron-microscopy.html

Artificial leaf under the microscope

Artificial leaf under the microscope – Since Daniel Nocera at MIT discovered a cobalt catalyst capable of splitting water, researchers have been trying to discover more about its structure and how it works. Now researchers in the US and Italy have used new techniques to gain a better insight into the structure and mechanism of these type of catalysts1 and hope that their research might lead to further improvements in the field2: References: 1. P Du et al, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2012, 134, 11096 (DOI: 10.1021/ja303826a). 2. S Berardi et al, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2012, 134, 11104 (DOI: 10.1021/ja303951z)