Molecules with rare and valuable light-absorbing abilities finally give up their structural secrets

Molecules with rare and valuable light-absorbing abilities finally give up their structural secrets – Potential applications for organic molecules that can interact with light in unusual ways range from next-generation solar cells to light-activated anticancer drugs. One of the oldest families of these brightly colored molecules is the phthalocyanines that were discovered in 1907 and subsequently prized by industry as dyes. A research team from Japan and Russia recently discovered a new branch of this family. The unusual light-capturing properties of these so-called ‘expanded phthalocyanines’ look set to springboard the phthalocyanines into a range of high-tech applications. Reference: 'Rectangular-Shaped Expanded Phthalocyanines with Two Central Metal Atoms', J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2012, 134 (7), pp 3411–3418 [cite]10.1021/ja209589x[/cite]

Molecules with rare and valuable light-absorbing abilities finally give up their structural secrets – Potential applications for organic molecules that can interact with light in unusual ways range from next-generation solar cells to light-activated anticancer drugs. One of the oldest families of these brightly colored molecules is the phthalocyanines that were discovered in 1907 and subsequently prized by industry as dyes. A research team from Japan and Russia recently discovered a new branch of this family. The unusual light-capturing properties of these so-called ‘expanded phthalocyanines’ look set to springboard the phthalocyanines into a range of high-tech applications. Reference: 'Rectangular-Shaped Expanded Phthalocyanines with Two Central Metal Atoms', J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2012, 134 (7), pp 3411–3418 (10.1021/ja209589x)

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Author: Robert Slinn

Robert Slinn is ChemSpy's guest columnist. You can read his chemical news updates under the banner "Slinn Pickings". Robert is a Chartered Chemist (CChem), Member of the Royal Society of Chemistry (MRSC) and is a Visiting Researcher in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Liverpool. He has extensive experience in R&D: synthesis, analysis and analytical methods development; troubleshooting, consultancy, and teaching/training methods in industry and in academia. Robert is also 'Physical Methods' author for the Specialist Periodical Report series 'Organophosphorus Chemistry', published by Royal Society of Chemistry, Cambridge, UK. Robert has worked alongside David on the Bedside Book of Chemistry and a major Thomson-Reuters report on the state of the pharmaceutical industry for the 2011 International Year of Chemistry