Funky fruit glitters for decades

Funky fruit glitters for decades – The shimmering multicoloured berries of the African shrub Pollia condensata are the first plant material to show structural colour – derived from their cellular configuration rather than pigments. They are also the brightest biological material ever discovered, more reflective than other structurally-coloured tissues like beetle exoskeletons, bird feathers or butterfly wings.[cite]10.1073/pnas.1210105109[/cite]

Funky fruit glitters for decades – The shimmering multicoloured berries of the African shrub Pollia condensata are the first plant material to show structural colour – derived from their cellular configuration rather than pigments. They are also the brightest biological material ever discovered, more reflective than other structurally-coloured tissues like beetle exoskeletons, bird feathers or butterfly wings.(10.1073/pnas.1210105109)

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Author: Robert Slinn

Robert Slinn is ChemSpy's guest columnist. You can read his chemical news updates under the banner "Slinn Pickings". Robert is a Chartered Chemist (CChem), Member of the Royal Society of Chemistry (MRSC) and is a Visiting Researcher in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Liverpool. He has extensive experience in R&D: synthesis, analysis and analytical methods development; troubleshooting, consultancy, and teaching/training methods in industry and in academia. Robert is also 'Physical Methods' author for the Specialist Periodical Report series 'Organophosphorus Chemistry', published by Royal Society of Chemistry, Cambridge, UK. Robert has worked alongside David on the Bedside Book of Chemistry and a major Thomson-Reuters report on the state of the pharmaceutical industry for the 2011 International Year of Chemistry