Detecting breast cancer’s fingerprint in a droplet of blood

Detecting breast cancer’s fingerprint in a droplet of blood – The earlier breast cancer is detected, the better the chance of successful treatment and long-term survival. However, early cancer diagnosis is still challenging as testing by mammography remains cumbersome, costly, and in many cases, cancer can only be detected at an advanced stage. A team based in McGill University's Faculty of Medicine has developed a new microfluidics-based microarray that could one day radically change how and when cancer is diagnosed. Reference: 'Antibody Colocalization Microarray: A Scalable Technology for Multiplex Protein Analysis in Complex Samples,' M. Pla-Roca et al, April 1, 2012 Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, 11, M111.011460 doi: 10.1074/mcp.M111.011460

Detecting breast cancer’s fingerprint in a droplet of blood – The earlier breast cancer is detected, the better the chance of successful treatment and long-term survival. However, early cancer diagnosis is still challenging as testing by mammography remains cumbersome, costly, and in many cases, cancer can only be detected at an advanced stage. A team based in McGill University's Faculty of Medicine has developed a new microfluidics-based microarray that could one day radically change how and when cancer is diagnosed. Reference: 'Antibody Colocalization Microarray: A Scalable Technology for Multiplex Protein Analysis in Complex Samples,' M. Pla-Roca et al, April 1, 2012 Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, 11, M111.011460 doi: 10.1074/mcp.M111.011460

Author: Robert Slinn

Robert Slinn is ChemSpy's guest columnist. You can read his chemical news updates under the banner "Slinn Pickings". Robert is a Chartered Chemist (CChem), Member of the Royal Society of Chemistry (MRSC) and is a Visiting Researcher in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Liverpool. He has extensive experience in R&D: synthesis, analysis and analytical methods development; troubleshooting, consultancy, and teaching/training methods in industry and in academia. Robert is also 'Physical Methods' author for the Specialist Periodical Report series 'Organophosphorus Chemistry', published by Royal Society of Chemistry, Cambridge, UK. Robert has worked alongside David on the Bedside Book of Chemistry and a major Thomson-Reuters report on the state of the pharmaceutical industry for the 2011 International Year of Chemistry