Chiral separation with microflows

Chiral separation with microflows – How do you separate enantiomers without any kind of chiral recognition between molecules? The answer it seems is to use asymmetric flow in a micro-fluidic channel. According to computer simulations run by scientists in Germany and Sweden, particles will move to different regions of the channel according to their chirality. Once there, they will migrate at different speeds, and thus they can be separated. The researchers say that this approach could lead to significant benefits in the pharmaceutical industry, where chiral separation plays a significant role in drug design. Reference: S Meinhardt et al, Phys. Rev. Lett., 2012, 108, 214504, DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.21450

Chiral separation with microflows – How do you separate enantiomers without any kind of chiral recognition between molecules? The answer it seems is to use asymmetric flow in a micro-fluidic channel. According to computer simulations run by scientists in Germany and Sweden, particles will move to different regions of the channel according to their chirality. Once there, they will migrate at different speeds, and thus they can be separated. The researchers say that this approach could lead to significant benefits in the pharmaceutical industry, where chiral separation plays a significant role in drug design. Reference: S Meinhardt et al, Phys. Rev. Lett., 2012, 108, 214504, DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.21450

Author: Robert Slinn

Robert Slinn is ChemSpy's guest columnist. You can read his chemical news updates under the banner "Slinn Pickings". Robert is a Chartered Chemist (CChem), Member of the Royal Society of Chemistry (MRSC) and is a Visiting Researcher in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Liverpool. He has extensive experience in R&D: synthesis, analysis and analytical methods development; troubleshooting, consultancy, and teaching/training methods in industry and in academia. Robert is also 'Physical Methods' author for the Specialist Periodical Report series 'Organophosphorus Chemistry', published by Royal Society of Chemistry, Cambridge, UK. Robert has worked alongside David on the Bedside Book of Chemistry and a major Thomson-Reuters report on the state of the pharmaceutical industry for the 2011 International Year of Chemistry