Carbon capture: Solar-powered option

Carbon capture: Solar-powered option – Photosynthesis is the ultimate solar-powered carbon capture technology. Plants extract carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and use sunlight to convert it into chemical energy. Now, a US team has suggested a novel reaction mechanism that can mimic photosynthesis in the binding of carbon dioxide using light energy captured by silicon nanowires. The researchers have even demonstrated proof of principle in the synthesis of two precursors of the anti-inflammatory, pain reducing drugs ibuprofen and naproxen. Original reference: 'Silicon Nanowires as Photoelectrodes for Carbon Dioxide Fixation', R. Liu et al, Angew Chem Int Edn, 2012, 51, DOI: 10.1002/anie.201202569

Carbon capture: Solar-powered option – Photosynthesis is the ultimate solar-powered carbon capture technology. Plants extract carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and use sunlight to convert it into chemical energy. Now, a US team has suggested a novel reaction mechanism that can mimic photosynthesis in the binding of carbon dioxide using light energy captured by silicon nanowires. The researchers have even demonstrated proof of principle in the synthesis of two precursors of the anti-inflammatory, pain reducing drugs ibuprofen and naproxen. Original reference: 'Silicon Nanowires as Photoelectrodes for Carbon Dioxide Fixation', R. Liu et al, Angew Chem Int Edn, 2012, 51, DOI: 10.1002/anie.201202569

Author: Robert Slinn

Robert Slinn is ChemSpy's guest columnist. You can read his chemical news updates under the banner "Slinn Pickings". Robert is a Chartered Chemist (CChem), Member of the Royal Society of Chemistry (MRSC) and is a Visiting Researcher in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Liverpool. He has extensive experience in R&D: synthesis, analysis and analytical methods development; troubleshooting, consultancy, and teaching/training methods in industry and in academia. Robert is also 'Physical Methods' author for the Specialist Periodical Report series 'Organophosphorus Chemistry', published by Royal Society of Chemistry, Cambridge, UK. Robert has worked alongside David on the Bedside Book of Chemistry and a major Thomson-Reuters report on the state of the pharmaceutical industry for the 2011 International Year of Chemistry